Why people aren’t converting on your pricing page

chrislema-face

20140504-122211.jpgI got the chance once to step into the pilot’s cockpit of the flight I’d been on from Oakland to Washington DC. It was incredible.

Within seconds I was overwhelmed. The number of dials, controls, nobs and displays made it impossible to know where to look and what to do.

I asked about the dizzying number of things to look at, and my friend (the pilot) responded that it takes a lot of training and preparation.

That makes perfect sense in a 747’s cockpit. Do you know where it doesn’t make sense? On your pricing page.

Keep focused

The pricing page isn’t where you list out all your features. Sure you may have a pricing grid and add a few differentiators.

But don’t distract users with extra things to look at. It will dilute the strength of your call to action.

Limit Complexity

A pricing grid with three options does better than one with two. That’s the good news.

But don’t get carried away. Some folks figure that since three is better than two, seven must be better than three.

If your pricing grid displays more than four options, you’ll likely push people into analysis paralysis instead of calling them to action.

Again, pilots are trained to look at tons of dials without freaking out. Your clients aren’t.

Bring attention to your CTAs

The interesting thing about that cockpit was that certain dials and levers were color coded. Even to an amateur, it was clear that not all dials were equal.

People will tell you blue converts better than orange. Or that orange converts better than red.

I don’t know if any of that is true. But I can tell you one thing: contrast converts better than a lack of contrast.

If your whole site is shades of blue, then orange buttons will likely convert better than blue ones. Because they stand out.

Not all elements on the page are equal. Help your users by helping those buttons stand out.

About Chris Lema

Chris Lema has been working with WordPress since 2005. Over the years he's been a blogger, a speaker at WordCamps, a coach for WordPress product companies, and the founder of the conference for WordPress business owners, called CaboPress. Today he's the VP of Products at Liquid Web, where he manages the world's first managed platform for WooCommerce stores.

Chris Lema

Chris Lema has been working with WordPress since 2005. Over the years he's been a blogger, a speaker at WordCamps, a coach for WordPress product companies, and the founder of the conference for WordPress business owners, called CaboPress. Today he's the VP of Products at Liquid Web, where he manages the world's first managed platform for WooCommerce stores.

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